Monster" is derived from the Latin noun monstrum, "divine portent," itself formed on the root of the verb monere, "to warn." It came to refer to living things of anomalous shape or structure, or to fabulous creatures like the sphinx who were composed of strikingly incongruous parts, because the ancients considered the appearance of such beings to be a sign of some impending supernatural event. Monsters, like angels, functioned as messengers and heralds of the extraordinary. They served to announce impending revelation, saying, in effect, "Pay attention; something of profound importance is happening.

My Words to Victor Frankenstein: by Susan Stryker (via whatmonstrosity)

(via face-down-asgard-up)

blueruins:

Hugh Ferriss, The Metropolis of Tomorrow

blueruins:

Hugh Ferriss, The Metropolis of Tomorrow

(via hideback)

Humor is more common among humans than among Andalites. I think they have to resort to humor. It helps them deal with the embarrassment of being so wobbly on their two ridiculous legs.

Ax, Book #18: The Decision, pg. 8 (by K.A. Applegate)

(Source: aniquotes, via fyanimorphs)

(Source: jamiepeanut, via thefrogman)

fuckyeahtattoos:

done by Dan at Tried and True Tattoo in Atlanta, GA
couldn’t be happier with it.

fuckyeahtattoos:

done by Dan at Tried and True Tattoo in Atlanta, GA

couldn’t be happier with it.

(via protective)

victoriousvocabulary:

SEREA

[noun]

mermaid; a female marine creature, having the head, torso, and arms of a woman and the tail of a fish.

Etymology: Galician.

[hoooook]

deadsymmetry:

William Hanagan

deadsymmetry:

William Hanagan

oldpainting:


AW 037 CM 1864 Hauling a boat ashore, Honfleur 5c - Rochester, Memorial Art Gallery of the University - wikiart by petrus.agricola on Flickr.